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Minneapolis 4d Affordable Housing Incentive Program for Rental Housing Owners

The City of Minneapolis 4d Affordable Housing Incentive Program is accepting applications through February 12, 2019.

The program was created in 2018 to help preserve naturally occurring affordable housing (NOAH). Owners of rental housing who enroll apartments in the program receive a 40% reduction in property taxes in exchange for making a 10-year commitment to keeping rents affordable.

Detailed information about the program, and a link to the application, is available on the City of Minneapolis website.

FHFund has compiled a list of FAQs based on real questions from interested potential participants.[1]

Click here to read about the experience of a participant in the program.

[1] While the information in this document is intended to be as accurate as possible, the City of Minneapolis and the State of Minnesota are ultimately responsible for interpreting program rules and relevant legislation.

January 19th, 2019|Data, Fact Sheet, Report|

Working doesn’t always pay for a home

By many measures, the Minneapolis-Saint Paul region is a great place to live. The quality of life is high, including ample green space and a vibrant arts scene; it is affordable relative to other cities; and there is a strong job market. Yet, many full time workers cannot find a home that is affordable to them.

Read the report here.

November 8th, 2018|Fact Sheet, Report|

Qualified Rental Housing Administrators and Receivers

In March 2018, the Family Housing Fund published a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) to identify qualified firms to act as Court-appointed administrator or receiver within the context of certain legal actions to protect and preserve low-cost rental housing and the occupancy by residents thereof in the Twin Cities metropolitan region. Through a review of applications and interviews with finalist applicants, an evaluation team identified Twin Cities firms who meet the Minimum Qualifications to perform the required Scope of Services (find full details in the link below). This list may serve as a resource for the Courts, local governments, and other housing stakeholders in the Twin Cities region. Inclusion on the list in no way implies an endorsement of any firm.

What’s inside the document:

  • List of 6 qualified firms summarizing expertise and contact information.
  • Review Process and Evaluation Team
  • Scope of Services required by the RFQ process
  • Minimum Qualifications required by the RFQ process
  • Future Opportunities to Apply
  • Family Housing Fund mission

Housing Counts 2016 Data Released

Since 2002, the Family Housing Fund and HousingLink have published the Housing Counts data set to provide housing leaders and other stakeholders an accurate and consistent way of tracking affordable housing (rental and homeownership) production and preservation each year in the seven-county Twin Cities region, including Minneapolis, St. Paul, and suburban metropolitan communities.

Since its inception, Housing Counts has tracked investment in projects representing more than 30,000 units of affordable housing throughout the seven-county region. In 2016, a grand total of 2,898 units of housing were funded for new development or preservation.

View the Housing Counts 2016 Report Here

Notes on the data:

  • The list of projects identifies how many affordable units are planned/preserved at three levels of affordability—30 percent, 50 percent, and 60 percent of the area median income (AMI). This corresponds with affordability restrictions required by certain funding streams.
  • The data set counts units in the year their project financing first closes and includes only developments with public and/or private capital funding that includes affordability obligations.
  • The report tables divide the projects into three main categories: new production of rental units, new production of homeownership units, and preservation/stabilization of existing rental units.
  • Rental assistance to renters, financial assistance directly to home buyers, and shelter beds are not included in this data set.
  • Developments that are designed specifically to serve seniors are indicated with an asterisk in the reports.
  • Properties included on the preservation/stabilization list were especially at risk of being lost due to major deterioration, financial crisis, or conversion to market-rate rents. This list does not include essential routine capital improvements.
  • Demolition permit numbers are included to give some context to the production numbers in relation to the number of units lost in the region’s housing stock. However, the demolition number comes from demolition permit issues only; because of this, the actual number of units lost, the affordability level, and the condition of these lost units is unknown.

For more information, please contact Sarah Berke at Family Housing Fund or Dan Hylton at HousingLink.

February 25th, 2018|Data, Housing Policy, Report|